Uganda

TRSOTT

The Rolling Stone at Orange Tree Theatre

The London premiere of The Rolling Stone, winner of a Bruntwood Prize for Playwriting in 2013 and first premiered at the Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester, in ...
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Film Screening of ‘Call Me Kuchu’

12 January 2016: LGBT + Friends @ the School presents 'Out on Tuesday' - a regular free film event with LGBT themed films from around the world. “Call ...
A posed posed portrait of 29 year old, trans woman Joseph with his mother 65 year old Mai. His mother had a hard time initially understanding Joseph’s sexuality and the community didn’t make it easy, questioning her for continuing to accept him, and at one occasion throwing stones at the house. She says though that he is a good son, that homosexuality has always existed and “I accept him and I protect him.” She worries about him constantly especially if she doesn’t see him for a couple of days. Joseph was arrested in December 2012. The police accused him of promoting homosexuality. He was tortured, the worst of which was when the police sodomized with a police baton that tore his anus and left him in severe pain and bleeding for weeks. He was released from prison after two weeks. He still has nightmares and flashbacks of the torture. Today he is a LGBT/HIV Aids Activist and volunteers for transgender HIV affected community. Uganda. March 2015.  While many countries around the world are legally recognizing same-sex relationships, individuals in nearly 80 countries face criminal sanctions for private consensual relations with another adult of the same sex. Violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender expression is even more widespread. Africa is becoming the worst continent for Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender, Queer, Inter-sex (LGBTQI) individuals. More than two thirds of African countries have laws criminalizing consensual same-sex acts. In some, homosexuality is punishable by death. In Nigeria new homophobic laws introduced in 2013 led to dramatic increase in attacks. Under Sharia Law, homosexuality is punishable by death, up to 50 lashes and six months in prison for woman; for men elsewhere, up to 14 years in prison. Same sex acts are illegal in Uganda. A discriminatory law was passed then struck down and homophobic attacks rose tenfold after the passage of the Anti-Homosexuality Act. In Cameroon it is also illegal. More cases ag

Out in Africa

At the entrance to a sprawling, open-air bar and restaurant in downtown Kampala, a large sign advertises what—six days out of seven—is on offer: music food ...
FRANKmugisha

Four Years of Uganda Pride

This year Uganda's out and proud marched through Entebbe to celebrate Pride for the fourth year running. Chris Godfrey caught up with the country's most promine...